Tag Archives: Christianity

Who Are Your Destiny Partners?

A Destiny Partner is a term that I came up with a few years ago, when I was working with some coaching clients and had an inspiration to help them look at their life differently. There is something about looking back at your life and looking for helpers in our life’s journey that gives many of us comfort.

You don’t have to believe in destiny to marvel at how sometimes people show up in our lives that are extremely important to our personal growth.

I’ve found there is an even more powerful question than asking who are our destiny partners for many of us, and that is:

Has there ever been a time in your life when you were a destiny partner for someone else? 

More than likely at some point in your life you have shown up in someone else’s life just when they needed a friend, a mentor, a colleague, a spouse or just a person who could listen.  It can feel like synchronicity, but often we don’t notice the importance of what we do for others.  This can be an incredibly empowering question for many people to answer.

Being that it’s Good Friday, I have another question to contemplate.

Does God or the Divine need us to be a destiny partner for goodness to come into this world? 

I believe the answer is yes. New Agey types,  including myself, talk about co-creation with the divine, and that sounds wonderful most of the time.  But sometimes the reality of what it means to be a destiny partner for the divine isn’t so easy.

I see the disciples and apostles of Jesus as his destiny partners.  Without them and the writers of the New Testament, and so many countless others, we would not know about Jesus’ life.  Perhaps a few mystics would feel Jesus life and presence, but most of us would never have heard his story.

Many of Jesus’ disciples were not too impressive on the day of his death which is of course commemorated today.   Interestingly, several of Jesus’ women “destiny partners” were with him to the end, and were also the ones that found the empty tomb a few days later.   It took courage and strength of character to be there when everything was falling apart.  As we know, for centuries, being a co-creator or destiny partner for Christianity was a dangerous thing to do.

Being a destiny partner to the divine and the truth, can still be dangerous, not only for Christians around the world, but also for Tibetan Buddhists, peaceful Islamic protestors striving for social justice across the Mideast, and many others of all faiths and even to those who are not aligned with religion but Imagine peace like John Lennon. For most of us, our lives are not going to end up in a world-changing spiritual story or a dangerous one.  I hope you never have to risk your life to live your destiny.  But you might!

Being a destiny partner is a high calling, even when we don’t see it.

For me, my children are my most important destiny partners. Who are yours?

For just ten minutes, think about who is and who has been helping you to grow as a person throughout your life.  Maybe more importantly, give yourself credit for all the people you have been serving through your life and how you embody goodness in the world, and without you the world would be a less divine place.

The Redemptive Power Within and All Around Us

Last night I saw an old friend on local Chicago television.  It brought back memories and gratitude.

About ten years ago, my ex-husband and I were doing our best to keep our marriage together and as a somewhat last resort, we made an appointment to see our pastor, Wayne Miller.  It was a difficult conversation, but also very healing.  Both my ex-husband and I talked about how much we loved our children, but no matter how hard we tried to stay together for their sake, our values were so different that living together had become impossible and toxic.

After we shared our story, Pastor Miller told us that while he didn’t have a specific prescription for us, that sometimes God brings people together for a purpose and perhaps we had completed that purpose, in creating our children.  At another point, he talked about how God might be redeeming both of us through our children.  He said, “With God, anything can be redeemed.”

I’m not sure that I’m quoting his exact words, but they were something close to that.  His words had a profound effect on me that still guides my life.

Before that meeting, I also had a one on one discussion with him about my faith. I started my discussion with him by saying that I was a mystic, and I was very proud of that fact.  He surprised me by asking, “How do you know you’re a mystic?”  I told him that I talked to God in my journal every day and had psychic experiences from time to time.  I went on to share that I wasn’t sure about being a Christian because there were many things that I had trouble believing like that there is only way to God and that people who didn’t believe in Jesus went to Hell.  I also didn’t agree with a patriarchal view of God as only a male figure.

What fascinated me the most about my personal conversation was that Pastor Miller questioned the idea that being a mystic was very important.   He talked about his own mystical experiences, but then emphasized the importance of how we show up in every day experiences.  His personal goal was to minimize his egotistical concerns and let the spirit of Jesus live through him.  When I saw him sing the Eucharist, I believed that Jesus was singing through him.  With me, he talked about the importance of moving beyond a personal experience of transcendence or being mystical to being a presence in the God in the imperfect real, material world in which we live.  Perhaps that’s why I attended a social justice rally with him to protest injustice around how education is funded in Illinois.

So, it didn’t surprise me last night, to see Wayne Miller who is now Bishop Miller, serving the Chicago Synod of the Lutheran Church, out in the streets of Chicago in a peace rally to stop the tide of murders that have been plaguing the city this year.  I have a feeling that Bishop Miller still believes that God can redeem anything, and it’s up to each of us to be part of that redemption.

A few months ago, I had a conversation with a woman who sons attend the school which my boys attend.  She’s going through a divorce and said to me, “You and your ex-husband and your kids inspire me.  You have given me the hope that this divorce could turn out ok.  You get along so well with your ex-husband and your kids are happy, good students who live a normal life.”

I’m not advocating that everyone get divorced.  Yet to me, to be able to be a role model of a “healthy divorce” comes from the power of redemption and grace.  Something that was a tragedy and hardship for me ten years ago was transformed through love, perseverance, and the workings of something much greater than myself.

Too often redemption seems to be described in a conditional way, as if, we have to believe or behave in a certain way.  My experience is that the power of redemption is much more unconditional than that.  You don’t need to live perfectly to be redeemed.

I have also come to believe that redemption is possibly the most mystical experience that any of us can have.   Yet, redemption often requires that we let go of many of our ideas of how life should be and embrace what is.  There is a power in facing the truth of our real flawed life that sets us free.

Here a few questions for your personal journey as a writer:

  1. How have you experienced the power of redemption in your life?
  2. Do you allow others to be redeemed through your actions?
  3. Do you believe that all mistakes and missteps in your life can be redeemed?
  4. Does your writing allow for redemptive experiences?

May you remember the power of redemption this week as you move through everyday life!

Weekly Video Blog: Are You Repelling or Attracting Your Destiny?


A rather trippy and deep post flowed out of me today.  Before I started writing, I had a strong intuition to find a particular book for this post, and when I found it, randomly opened the book to exactly the idea that was seeking to be expressed through me.

For your own heart’s sake, I hope you will take a moment this weekend to contemplate the words in this post, because they could open your mind to some new yet old ideas that just might awaken a spark of remembrance in your soul as they did for me.

Do you believe that you have a destiny that can be repelled by the way in which you live?  Do you believe like many that there is a law of attraction that you can use to create whatever type of life you would want to live? Or must you submit to forces outside of yourself to be on your best path in life?

These are questions that have been on the minds of men and women since the dawn of human history.  For the next few days I’d like to share some different perspectives about how we repel and attract our “destiny” from great souls who have come before us.

Today, let’s begin an exploration with some radical ideas from a German Christian mystic, Meister Eckhart (1260-1328).  When I first read Meister Eckhart in the early 1990’s,  I was blown away that a medieval Christian priest would have ideas that were so profound and in some ways seemingly Eastern in their philosophy and scope.

In the passage that follows, Eckhart does not use the word destiny once, but talks about one of the common themes in many religions that the animal or creature part of us keeps us from fully living as God would desire, which is through us.  Many of the most holy people who I’ve met in my life talk about this same idea of getting out of the way of God, so that which is individual in them disappears to let God shine through.  There are problems with this approach, which we’ll discuss at another time.  For today, let’s look at the strengths of this idea.

I love this particular passage from one of Meister Eckhart’s sermons and hope it will cause you to think about your own ideas of destiny, free will, and the possibility that the divine spark of God within you actually needs you to allow it to live through you:

For if Life were questioned a thousand years and asked: “Why live?” and if there were an answer, it could be no more than this: “I live only to live!”  And that is because Life is its own reason for being, springs from its own Source, and goes on and on, without ever asking why — just because it is life.  Thus, if you ask a genuine person, that is, one who acts from his heart:  “Why are you doing that?”  — he will reply in the only possible way: “I do it because I do it!”

Where the creature ends, there God begins to be.  God only asks that you get out of his way, in so far as you are creature, and let him be God in you.  The least creaturely idea that ever entered your mind is as big as God.  Why?  Because it will keep God out of you entirely.  The moment you get one of your own ideas, God fades out and the Godhead too.  It is when the idea is gone that God gets in. 

God desires that you, the creature, get out of his way — as if his own blessedness depended on it.  Ah, beloved people, why don’t you let God be God in you?  What are you afraid of? You get completely out of his way and he will get out of yours  — you give up to him and he will give up to you.  When both have forsaken self, what remains is an indivisible union. It is in this unity that the Father begets his Son in the secret spring of your nature.  Then the Holy Spirit blooms and out of God there comes a will which belongs to the soul. As long as this will remains uncorrupted by creatures, it is free.  Christ says, No man riseth to heaven but he that came from heaven.”  All things were created out of nothingness and thus their true nature is the “Not”.  That is why the aristocratic will, to the extent that it condescends to created things, lapses at last with them to their nothingness.

It is sometimes asked whether this noble will may lapse so completely that it cannot recover.  The authorities usually teach that, if it has lapsed for some time, there is no recovery.  But I say, if will is directed back again, to its secret source, it will once again be as it was, formally free and really free, and at once all the time that was lost will be made up.

People often say to me: “Pray for me!”  At that I have to wonder: Why did you ever leave him?  And why not be your true self and reach into your own treasure? For the whole truth is just as much in you as in me!

That we all may similarly remain close to this treasure, that we may all may know the truth blessedly, without anything separating us from it, or standing in between, may God help! Amen.

Is this the type of sermon you would expect to read from a medieval Christian priest, talking about everything coming out of nothingness? If we circle back to some of my earlier blogs this year about the Zen concept of everything coming out of nothingness, and compare those ideas to those of Meister Eckhart’s, it is quite reassuring to see how mystics across the planet have been discovering the same truths from the context of different spiritual traditions.

So, with Eckhart’s wisdom as a tool for growth, we might say that part of attracting or repelling our destiny depends on how much we allow our own connection to divinity to live through us.  That’s what the energetic elixirs that I spoke of us earlier this week allow us to do — clear the space for more of our true self/heart to be expressed through us in our everyday life, so that we can say with all confidence and authenticity:

“I do it because I do it!”

When we reach that point of living from our heart, any concerns of repelling or attracting our destiny disappear because we are on the path towards living the most holy destiny or life that is ours to live.

More about this tomorrow . . .

Can you feel the truth and the freedom in Meister Eckhart’s understanding of Life?